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RED SEA TECHNICAL DIVING A PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE

I first dived the Red Sea just after Moses and the Israelites had crossed it. No, that’s an exaggeration but now it does seem like a very long time ago.
Scuba-diving was in its infancy and most of the experienced dive-guides had learnt their business from being backpackers who had a go at diving. They did a lot of diving and had a tremendous amount of experience together with masses of in-water confidence, yet their theoretical knowledge of diving could be a little sparse.
The calm clear deep water invited the intrepid to go deep. There soon grew up among dive-guides a deep-diving culture that was to claim many lives. The Blue Hole at Dahab regularly claimed divers and, in those days, military ‘helium-divers’ from the Israeli were called in to recover the bodies.

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Top Common Diving Mistakes

Ahmed Khalifa,
PADI IDC Staff Instructor. SDI Specialty Instructor.
But above all, I’m honored to be a war diver, I have started my dive career as a war diver (Egyptian Special Forces, 777) and then continued my dive education as PADI professional.
Throughout this journey, I have witnessed many divers doing common mistakes but before we talk about them we need to know why we do mistakes!!

There are always 2 sides of the coin, either the trainer or the diver himself could be the rout cause of the problem/mistake,

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Backplate & Wing Systems: Advantages & disadvantages?

backplate and wing (often abbreviated as BP&W or BP/W) is a type of scuba harness with an attached buoyancy compensation device (BCD) which establishes neutral buoyancy underwater and positive buoyancy on the surface. Unlike most other BCDs, the backplate and wing is a modular system, in that it consists of separable components. The core components of this system are:

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How can Yoga enhance your Scuba Diving experience?

The average diver sightseeing at 30 feet in warm, calm seas can expect an average tank of air to last about an hour. But as any diver can tell you, our sport is anything but average. Deeper dives, stronger currents and chilly water can drastically reduce bottom time. New divers, a little panicky and prone to “panting” rather than easy breathing, have been known to suck a tank dry in 15 minutes.

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